Supreme Court Upholds “Clear and Convincing” Standard of Proof for Patent Invalidity While Suggesting Juries Be Instructed on the Weight of the Evidence

On June 9, 2011, the Supreme Court in an 8-0 decision authored by Justice Sotomayor, affirmed the long-standing rule that a challenger must demonstrate invalidity of a patent by “clear and convincing evidence.” Microsoft Corp. v. i4i Ltd. Partnership, 564 U.S.__, slip op. at 20 (June 9, 2011).  Microsoft had argued for a more relaxed “preponderance of the evidence” standard in a case where the prior art that formed the basis for the challenge had not been considered by the Patent Office.  While the holding puts to rest speculation over whether the Court would apply the lesser standard of proof, the Court endorsed the use of a jury instruction on the weight to be given prior art evidence that had not been considered by the Patent Office, stating that such an instruction, “when requested, most often should be given.”  Id.at 17.

Section 282 of the Patent Act of 1952 provides that “[a] patent shall be presumed valid” and “[t]he burden of establishing invalidity of a patent or any claim thereof shall rest on the party asserting such invalidity.”  35 U.S.C. § 282. While § 282 expressly places the burden of proof regarding validity of the patent upon an accused infringer, it does not expressly address the standard of proof.  Microsoft argued that the preponderance standard applied generally or, in the alternative, at least where the prior art asserted had not been considered by the Patent Office.  The Court rejected both contentions.

The Supreme Court rejected Microsoft’s first contention by finding that Congress had adopted the heightened standard from the common-law in 1952 when it enacted § 282.  The Court determined that by the time of the 1952 Act, the common law presumption of validity reflected the “universal understanding” that the preponderance standard was insufficient.  That understanding was reflected in the holding of Radio Corp. of America v. Radio Engineering Laboratories, Inc., 293 U.S. 1 (1934). In that case, the Supreme Court held that an accused infringer must overcome the presumption of validity by “clear and cogent evidence.” Id.at 2.  Accordingly, the Court held that the codification of the presumption in § 282 brought with it its common-law meaning, including the heightened standard proof, and there was no reason to “drop” the heightened standard simply because §282 does not explicitly recite it.

In arguing for the lesser “preponderance of the evidence” standard of proof when the prior art was not considered by the Patent Office, Microsoft relied in part on the Supreme Court’s dicta in KSR Int’l Co. v. Teleflex Inc., 550 U.S. 398, 426 (2007), that at least in cases where the invalidating prior art was not before the Patent Office, the presumption of validity “seems much diminished.”

Notwithstanding its earlier observation, the Supreme Court rejected the notion of a variable standard of proof.  The Court acknowledged language found in “numerous courts of appeals” cases before the 1952 Act, that referred to the presumption of validity being “weakened” or “dissipated” when the evidence was not considered by the Patent Office.  However, it explained that such language could not be read as supporting a different standard.  “Instead, we understand these cases to reflect the same common sense principle that the Federal Circuit has recognized throughout its existence—namely, that new evidence supporting an invalidity defense may ‘carry more weight’ in an infringement action than evidence previously considered by the Patent Office.”   Slip op. at 17.  Accordingly, “new evidence” of invalidity may make it “easier” for a challenger to meet the “clear and convincing” standard.

The Court suggested that the weight to be given this new evidence be explained in an instruction to the jury:

[A] jury instruction on the effect of new evidence can, and when requested, most often should be given. When warranted, the jury may be instructed to consider that it has heard evidence that the PTO had no opportunity to evaluate before granting the patent. . .  [T]he jury may be instructed to evaluate whether the evidence before it is materially new, and if so, to consider that fact when determining whether an invalidity defense has been proved by clear and convincing evidence.

Id.at 17.  This language will undoubtedly increase the frequency of requests for a specific instruction on the weight of the new evidence and on the use of such instructions.

Justice Breyer, joined by Justices Scalia and Alito, wrote a concurring opinion which emphasizes the need to pay careful attention to the distinction between fact questions and legal questions, noting that the standard only applies to evidence of the facts.  The Court’s opinion, slip op. at 2, does note that the ultimate question of patent validity is a question of law and that the same factual questions underlying the Patent Office’s original examination will also be present in an infringement action.  Id.  While this language is suggestive, the Court’s opinion never expressly states that the standard of proof applies only to the factual questions.  The concurrence thus raises the question of whether a court should refrain from applying the clear and convincing standard to legal conclusions, such as whether given facts render an invention obvious.  Further, the observations of the concurrence may impact the specific questions put to the jury in the form of a special verdict and instructions regarding the standard of proof.

Thus, the development of the patent law may be more affected by dicta from Microsoft Corp. v. i4i Ltd. Partnership than by its holding, which affirms the long-standing “clear and convincing” standard.

Supreme Court Upholds Clear and Convincing Standard for Invalidity but with a Twist

A unanimous Supreme Court has rejected Microsoft’s argument that a lower “preponderance of the evidence” standard should apply to patent invalidity challenges. The Supreme Court, in last week’s Microsoft Corp. v. i4i Limited Partnership decision, reaffirmed the longstanding principle that a party challenging the validity of a patent must present “clear and convincing” evidence of invalidity.

The Supreme Court first established this heightened burden in the 1934 case of Radio Corp. of America v. Radio Engineering Labs, Inc. 293 U.S. 1 (1934). There, the Supreme Court held that invalidation required “clear and cogent evidence” to overturn an issued patent. The Patent Act later codified this heightened burden in 35 U.S.C. § 282, explaining that a patent “shall be presumed valid.”

Microsoft argued that the Court’s settled interpretation of Section 282 was incorrect and that the presumption of validity does not establish the need for “clear and convincing” evidence to invalidate a patent.

Relying on almost a century of precedent, the Supreme Court disagreed:

[B]y the time Congress enacted § 282 and declared that a patent is “presumed valid,” the presumption of patent validity had long been a fixture of the common law. According to its settled meaning, a defendant raising an invalidity defense [bears] “a heavy burden of persuasion,” requiring proof of the defense by clear and convincing evidence.

The Court also disagreed with Microsoft’s alternative argument—that the presumption of validity should be weakened when a party challenges a patent using art not before the Patent Office during prosecution. According to the Court, invalidity of a patent must always be proven by clear and convincing evidence.

An interesting twist comes in the Court’s recognition that “new evidence” of invalidity likely carries more weight than evidence already considered by the Patent Office. The Court references with approval the jury instruction given in the 1993 case of Mendenhall v. Cedarrapids, Inc. that states:

Because the deference to be given the Patent Office’s determination is related to the evidence it had before it, you should consider the evidence presented to the Patent Office during the [] application process, compare it with the evidence you have heard in this case, and then determine what weight to give the Patent Office’s determinations.5 F.3d 1557 (Fed. Cir. 1993).

The Court explained that “[a] jury may be instructed to evaluate whether the evidence before it is materially new, and if so, to consider that fact when determining whether an invalidity defense has been proved by clear and convincing evidence.” Put differently, the Court recognized that a jury may properly give evidence of “new” prior art special weight in deciding whether the clear and convincing standard has been met.

On the whole, the Court’s ruling on the clear and convincing evidence standard can be viewed as a pro-patent decision (contrary to several of the Court’s other recent decisions, like KSR (obviousness), MedImmune (declaratory judgment jurisdiction), and eBay (permanent injunctions)). Yet, its explicit acknowledgement of the role which “new” prior art can have may give accused infringers and their defense counsel some degree of satisfaction. Using “new” prior art not considered by the Patent Office during prosecution, along with the benefit of good jury instructions emphasizing the proper place of this “new” prior art, defendants may improve their chances of invalidating asserted patents.

Supreme Court Unanimously Maintains High Hurdle for Invalidity Defense

June 9th, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled1 that an accused infringer must prove its invalidity defense by clear and convincing evidence. Microsoft Corp. v. i4i Ltd. P’ship, — S. Ct. — 564 U.S. —, 2011 WL 2224428, slip op. at 1, 16 (June 9, 2011).2 In a case of first impression, the Court determined that this standard applies even when the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“Patent Office”) did not consider the evidence of invalidity currently before the jury in the patent examination process. Id. The hurdle for proving invalidity historically has been high and now remains high.

According to Justice Sotomayor (who wrote for the majority), “Congress specified the applicable standard of proof in 1952 when it codified the common-law presumption of patent validity.” Id. at 20. “Nothing . . . suggests that Congress meant to depart from that understanding to enact a standard of proof that would rise and fall with the facts of each case.” This decision thus keeps in place decades of existing jurisprudence and will continue to allow patent owners to value their portfolios based on past practices. Although accused infringers can take certain steps to minimize negative effects of the clear-and-convincing standard, “[a]ny recalibration of the standard of proof” is now solely in the hands of Congress. Id.

Historical Basis of Proving Invalidity

To receive patent protection, a claimed invention must meet the statutory requirements of patentability. The claimed invention, for example, must fall within certain patentable subject matter (§ 101), be novel (§ 102), be nonobvious (§ 103), and be disclosed in the patent application in sufficient detail to meet the enablement, best mode, and written description requirements (§ 112). Thus, the Patent Office issues a patent for a claimed invention only if its examiners determine that the claimed invention meets all of the statutory requirements. Once issued, a patent holder has the exclusive right to exclude others from using the claimed invention for the term of the patent.

An accused infringer, however, can escape liability for infringement by proving that the patent is invalid (i.e., that the Patent Office should not have issued it in the first place). Under § 282, however, “[a] patent shall be presumed valid” and “[t]he burden of establishing invalidity of a patent . . . rest[s] on the party asserting such invalidity.” 35 U.S.C. § 282. For over thirty years, the Federal Circuit has interpreted that section to require “a defendant seeking to overcome this presumption [to] persuade the factfinder of its invalidity defense by clear and convincing evidence.” Microsoft Corp., 2011 WL 2224428, slip op. at 3. According to Judge Rich, a principal drafter of the 1952 Patent Act, “Section 282 creates a presumption that a patent is valid and imposes the burden of proving invalidity on the attacker” by clear and convincing evidence. Am. Hoist & Derrick Co. v. Sowa & Sons, Inc., 725 F.3d 1350, 1360 (Fed. Cir. 1984). “That burden is consistent and never changes.” Id.

Microsoft Unsuccessfully Challenged Federal Circuit’s Long-Standing Precedent

In 2007, i4i sued Microsoft claiming that Microsoft Word infringed its patent for an improved method for editing computer documents. Microsoft Corp., 2011 WL 2224428, slip op. at 4. In addition to denying infringement, Microsoft argued that § 102(b)’s on-sale bar rendered i4i’s patent invalid due to i4i’s sale of a software program, S4, prior to the filing of the i4i patent application. Id. The parties agreed that i4i had sold the S4 program prior to the filing of the patent at issue but looked to the jury to determine whether S4 embodied the claimed invention. Id. Relying on the undisputed fact that S4 was never presented to the Patent Office, Microsoft objected to i4i’s proposed instruction requiring the jury find proof of invalidity by clear and convincing evidence. Id. In its place, Microsoft requested a jury instruction limiting its burden of proof, “with regard to its defense of invalidity based on prior art that the examiner did not review during the prosecution of the patent-in-suit” to a “preponderance of the evidence.” Id. at 6 (internal quotation marks and citation omitted).

The District Court rejected Microsoft’s proposed instruction and instructed the jury that “Microsoft has the burden of proving invalidity by clear and convincing evidence.” Id. (internal quotation marks and citation omitted). Based on this instruction, the jury found that Microsoft had willfully infringed i4i’s patent and that Microsoft had failed to prove its invalidity defense. The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed, concluding that “the jury instructions were correct in light of [the] court’s precedent, which requires the challenger to prove invalidity by clear and convincing evidence.” i4i Ltd. P’ship v. Microsoft Corp., 598 F.3d 831, 848 (Fed. Cir. 2010).

Supreme Court Rejected Microsoft’s Arguments—Invalidity Must Be Proved by Clear and Convincing Evidence

Microsoft sought certiorari from the Supreme Court as to (1) whether “a defendant in an infringement action need only persuade the jury of an invalidity defense by a preponderance of the evidence” and (2) whether “a preponderance standard must apply at least when an invalidity defense rests on evidence that was never considered by the [Patent Office] in the examination process.” Id. at 5-6. The answer to both of Microsoft’s questions is a clear and unqualified no.

In reaching this decision, the Court started with a common axiom of statutory interpretation: “Where Congress has prescribed the governing standard of proof, its choice controls absent ‘countervailing constitutional constraints.'” Id. at 6 (citing Steadman v. SEC, 450 U.S. 91, 95 (1981)). It then asked the next logical question—”whether Congress made such a choice” when it enacted § 282. To answer this question, the Court first analyzed the plain language of statute. The Court noted that the statute “establishes a presumption of patent validity, and it provides that a challenger must overcome that presumption to prevail on an invalidity defense”; however, the Court recognized that “it includes no express articulation of the standard of proof.” Id. Nevertheless, the Court concluded that Congress used the term “presumed valid” according to its settled meaning in the common law—a term encompassing “not only an allocation of the burden of proof but also an imposition of a heightened standard of proof.” Id. at 7-8.3

“The common-law presumption, in other words, reflected the universal understanding that a preponderance standard of proof was too ‘dubious’ a basis to deem a patent invalid.” Microsoft Corp., 2011 WL 2224428, slip op. at 8. Accordingly, when Congress declared that a patent is “presumed valid,” “the presumption encompassed not only an allocation of the burden of proof but also an imposition of a heightened standard of proof.” Id. Based on this wide-spread understanding of the common law term, the Court refused to conclude “that Congress intended to drop the heightened standard of proof from the presumption simply because § 282 fails to reiterate it expressly.” Id. at 9 (internal quotation marks and citation omitted). Rather, the Court concluded that it “‘must presume that Congress intended to incorporate’ the heightened standard of proof, ‘unless the statute otherwise directs.'” Id. (quoting Neder v. United States, 527 U.S. 1, 23 (1999)). Simply put, “[t]he language Congress selected reveals its intent not only to specify that the defendant bears the burden of providing invalidity but also that the evidence in support of the defense must be clear and convincing.” Id. at 12 n.7.

Notably, the Court rejected Microsoft’s attempts to distinguish nearly century’s worth of otherwise clear case law: “Squint as we may, we fail to see the qualifications that Microsoft purports to identify in our cases.” Id. at 10. Likewise, the Court rejected Microsoft’s argument that the Federal Circuit’s interpretation of § 282 must fail, because applying that interpretation of the phrase “presumed valid” renders superfluous the statute’s additional phrase, “[t]he burden of establishing invalidity of a patent . . . shall rest on the party asserting such invalidity.” Id. at 12. Although Justice Sotomayor (writing for the majority) seems to agree with Microsoft that the Federal Circuit’s interpretation renders some of the statute superfluous, the Court reminded Microsoft that “the canon against superfluity assists only where a competing interpretation gives effect ‘to every clause and word of a statute.'” Id. (citing Duncan v. Walker, 533 U.S. 167, 174 (2001)). The Court thus found the rule inapplicable here, where “no interpretation of § 282—including the two alternatives advanced by Microsoft—avoids excess language.” Id. at 13.

In addressing Microsoft’s second, more limited argument, the Court rejected Microsoft’s request for a variable standard of proof:

Our pre-1952 cases never adopted or endorsed the kind of fluctuating standard of proof that Microsoft envisions. And they do not indicate, even in dicta, that anything less than a clear-and-convincing standard would ever apply to an invalidity defense raised in an infringement action. . . . Nothing in § 282’s text suggests that Congress meant to depart from that understanding to enact a standard of proof that would rise and fall with the facts of each case.

Id. at 15-16.

Accused Infringers Have Options

The accused infringer, however, is not without options. Although the Court steadfastly affirmed the heightened standard of proof, it recognized that “new evidence supporting an invalidity defense may carry more weight in an infringement action than evidence previously considered by the [Patent Office].” Id. at 17. Indeed, the Patent Office’s judgment may lose significant force if it did not have all the material facts before it. Id. In turn, this may make it easier for the accused infringer to satisfy its burden (e.g., to use the new evidence to persuade the jury of a patent’s invalidity by clear and convincing evidence). Id. Accordingly, if faced with new evidence of invalidity, an accused infringer should consider taking the following actions:

  1. Request a jury instruction on the effect of new evidence not considered by the Patent Office. When requested, such an instruction “most often should be given.” Id. “When warranted, the jury may be instructed to consider that it has heard evidence that the [Patent Office] had no opportunity to evaluate before granting the patented.” Id.
  2. If the parties dispute whether the evidence presented to the jury differs from the evidence previously before the Patent Office, seek an instruction mandating that the jury consider that question. Id. at 18. “The jury may be instructed to evaluate whether the evidence before it is materially new, and if so, to consider that fact when determining whether an invalidity defense has been proved by clear and convincing evidence.” Id. (citing Mendenhall v. Cedarapids, Inc., 5 F.3d 1557, 1563-64 (Fed. Cir. 1993)).
  3. Remember that the clear and convincing standard of proof is an evidentiary standard that applies only to questions of fact to the trial court. Microsoft Corp. v. i4i Ltd. P’ship, — S. Ct. — 564 U.S. —, 2011 WL 2224428, at *12 (June 9, 2011) (Breyer, J., concurring). Accordingly, separate “factual and legal aspects of an invalidity claim . . . by using instructions based on case-specific circumstances that help the jury make the distinction.” Id. at *13. In addition, use interrogatories and special verdicts “to make clear which specific factual findings underlie the jury’s conclusions.” Id. “By preventing the ‘clear and convincing’ standard from roaming outside its fact-related reservation, courts can increase the likelihood that discoveries or inventions will not receive legal protection where none is due.” Id.

Conclusion

Despite Microsoft’s valiant challenge, yesterday’s unanimous opinion keeps the hurdle high for parties trying to show that a patent is invalid. Although accused infringers are not without their options, any modification of the clear and convincing standard itself now requires an Act of Congress.

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1All eight participating Justices concurred in the judgment.  Justice Sotomayor delivered the opinion of the Court, in which Justices Scalia, Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer, Alito, and Kagan joined.  Justice Breyer filed a concurring opinion, in which Justices Scalia and Alito joined.  Although Justice Breyer joined the Justice Sotomayor opinion in full, he wrote separately to emphasize that the clear and convincing standard of proof applies only to questions of fact, not to questions of law.  Justice Thomas filed an opinion concurring only in the judgment.  According to Justice Thomas, the heightened standard of proof applies because § 292 is silent and therefore does not alter the common-law rule.  Chief Justice Roberts took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.
2This case marks the third patent-law case released by the Supreme Court during the past two weeks.  Earlier this week, the Court ruled that the Bayh-Dole Act does not eclipse inventors’ rights. See Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior Univ. v. Roche Molecular Sys., 563 U.S. —, 2011 WL 2175210 (June 5, 2011).  On May 31, 2011, the Supreme Court ruled that induced infringement of a patent required knowledge that the induced acts constituted patent infringement.  See Global-Tech Appliances, Inc. v. SEB S.A., — S. Ct. —, 2011 WL 2119109 (May 31, 2011).  Each of these cases affirmed the Federal Circuit.
3Indeed, the Court concluded that by the time Congress enacted the 1952 Patent Act, “a common core of thought” unified the decisions of courts across the country:

“[O]ne otherwise an infringer who assails the validity of a patent fair upon its face bears a heavy burden of persuasion, and fails unless his evidence has more than a dubious preponderance.  If that is true where the assailant connects himself in some way with the title of the true inventor, it is so a fortiori where he is a stranger to the [claimed] invention, without claim of title of his own.  If it is true where the assailant launches his attack with evidence different, at least in form, from any theretofore produced in opposition to the patent, it is so a bit more clearly where the evidence is even verbally the same.”

Id. (citing Radio Corp. of Am. v. Radio Eng’r Labs, Inc., 293 U.S. 1, 8 (1934).  As Justice Cardozo put it, “there is a presumption of validity, a presumption not to be overthrown except by clear and cogent evidence.”  Radio Corp. of Am., 293 U.S. at 2.

Supreme Court: Evidence Of Invalidity Must Be “Clear And Convincing”

On June 9, 2011, the Supreme Court rejected Microsoft’s contention that a preponderance of the evidence should be sufficient to establish patent invalidity in an 8-0 (Roberts abstained) opinion, which affirmed the Fed. Cir.’s opinion (for a change). (The decision can be found at the end of this post.) The Court interpreted Congress’ intent in 35 USC 282 to preserve the presumption of validity of a patent claim unless an attacker can meet the burden of presenting “clear and convincing” evidence of invalidity.

The Court also rejected the notion that some sort of “fluctuating standard of proof” should apply in situations in which the evidence relied upon was not considered by the PTO during prosecution. Even if the primary rationale behind the clear and convincing standard, that the PTO applied its expertise correctly, “seems much diminished’ (citing KSR 550 US 398), the Court held that Congress “codified the common-law presumption of patent validity and, implicitly the heightened standard of proof attached to it” and that standard of proof must still be met. The Court suggested that, in such cases, the jury could be instructed that it could give weight to the fact that the evidence before it is “materially new” when determining if clear and convincing evidence of invalidity had been presented.

Supreme Court Leaves Standard for Patent Invalidity Unchanged

Earlier today, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its much-anticipated opinion in Microsoft Corp. v. i4i L.P. The Court had granted certiorari to consider the question of whether section 282 of the Patent Act, 35 U.S.C. § 282, requires a defense of patent invalidity to be proven by clear and convincing evidence. Contrary to what many commentators were expecting, the Court left the burden of proof for invalidity defenses unchanged-defendants still must prove any invalidity defense by clear and convincing evidence.

The Court focused on early cases cited by the plaintiff/appellee, including a 1934 opinion written by Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo that stated “there is a presumption of validity, a presumption not to be overthrown except by clear and cogent evidence.” Based on such decisions, the Court determined it was well understood prior to the passage of the current Patent Act in 1952 that the presumption of validity could be overcome only by clear and convincing evidence. Accordingly, when Congress enacted section 282, which set forth a presumption of validity, the Court found that Congress intended to adopt the existing burden of proof for overcoming the presumption. The Court held that “[u]nder the general rule that a common-law term comes with its common-law meaning, we cannot conclude that Congress intended to ‘drop’ the heightened standard proof [sic] from the presumption simply because [section] 282 fails to reiterate it expressly.”

The Court did not accept Microsoft’s alternative argument that the burden of proof should be different for invalidity defenses based on prior art references not considered by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) in granting an asserted patent. The Court did, however, recognize the “commonsense principle” that “new evidence supporting an invalidity defense may ‘carry more weight’ in an infringement action than evidence previously considered by the PTO. . . . Simply put, if the PTO did not have all material facts before it, its considered judgment may lose significant force.” Thus, the Court noted that “a jury instruction on the effect of new evidence can, and when requested, most often should be given. When warranted, the jury may be instructed to consider that it has heard evidence that the PTO had no opportunity to evaluate before granting a patent.”

Justice Breyer (joined by Justices Scalia and Alito) also filed an interesting concurrence stressing that the clear-and-convincing standard applies only to factual issues relating to invalidity defenses, and not to legal questions. “Where the ultimate question of patent validity turns on the correct answer to legal questions-what these subsidiary legal standards mean or how they apply to the facts as given-today’s strict standard of proof has no application.” The concurring Justices thus urged district courts to keep these issues separate “by using instructions based on case-specific circumstances that help the jury make the distinction or by using interrogatories and special verdicts to make clear which specific factual findings underlie the jury’s conclusions.” For years, some members of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit have been urging district courts and litigants to use verdict forms and jury interrogatories that ask for more detail about the factual findings underlying decisions on issues such as obviousness, but those efforts have met with mixed results. It will be interesting to see whether these comments from three Supreme Court Justices will have any significant effect on how patent cases are actually tried.

New Standards for Litigants in Patent Cases: Inequitable Conduct is No Longer a Boiler Plate Defense

In recent years, an all too common defensive strategy to patent infringement claims has been to cry foul on the patent-holder and allege misconduct during the patenting process. Inequitable conduct, a judicially created equitable doctrine, is a defense to patent infringement allegations, which if successfully proven, can bar enforcement of the patent. However, inequitable conduct allegations may not have the same legal luster they once held based on the recent Federal Circuit holding in Therasense, Inc. v. Becton, Dickinson & Co.

Years of fluctuating opinions on the issue of inequitable conduct and its remedies, coupled with the over-use of the defense, has “plagued not only on the courts but also the entire patent system.” Fearing the guillotine-like effects of inequitable conduct charges, those applying for patents have deluged the PTO (Patent and Trademark Office) with often hundreds of unnecessary documents in an attempt to comply with the disclosure requirements during the patenting process. Such document submissions have created a backlog at the PTO. Moreover, fearing their clients may lose a patent infringement claim, an estimated “80 percent of patent infringement cases included allegations of inequitable conduct” as a defense. However, those days may now be over as Therasense will likely be a dramatic game-changer in the strategic side of patent litigation.

The Federal Circuit’s en banc decision under Chief Judge Rader sets forth new standards for establishing a defense of inequitable conduct. First, the opinion clarified what is meant by the term intentionally deceive: “to prevail on a claim of inequitable conduct, the accused infringer must prove that the patentee acted with the specific intent to deceive the PTO.” Rather than the amorphous criteria for intent that previously included negligence, gross negligence, and that the applicant “should have known,” now claims must be supported by clear and convincing evidence. Further, if nondisclosure of information regarding prior art is the foundation of an inequitable conduct claim, there must be clear and convincing evidence that the “applicant made a deliberate decision to withhold a known material reference.” Thus, a defendant can no longer just point to a general nondisclosure, but rather, must have sufficient evidence to show the applicant “knew of the reference, knew that it was material, and made a deliberate decision” to withhold it from the PTO.

Unlike cases that treat intent and materiality interchangeably, Judge Rader clarified that the two are “separate requirements” under an inequitable conduct defense. This distinction abolishes the use of a “sliding scale” by courts whereby a weak showing of intent could simply be supplemented with a strong showing of materiality and vice versa. Because these two elements are separate, neither can be inferred based on the existence of the other, forcing courts to now “weigh the evidence of intent to deceive independent of its analysis of materiality.”

The court also discussed the form of proof for intent, recognizing that “direct evidence of deceptive intent is rare,” therefore allowing judges to make inferences from “indirect and circumstantial evidence.” Because varying judicial inferences previously encouraged the proliferation of inequitable conduct claims, the court established that a clear and convincing evidence standard again must be met. However, the specific intent to deceive must be the “single most reasonable inference able to be drawn from the evidence.” Therefore, if “multiple reasonable inferences” as to the applicant’s intent can be drawn, then the defense will fail to meet this heightened standard.

Second, the ruling held that “but-for materiality” is required to prove inequitable conduct on the part of an applicant. The stringent standard of but-for materiality comes down to a simple question- had the PTO known of the prior art that an applicant failed to disclose, would the PTO have allowed their claim? If the PTO “would not have allowed a claim had it been aware of the undisclosed prior art,” the prior art is but-for material. However, like with most rules, the court carved out an exception– but-for proof is not necessary in cases of “affirmative egregious conduct”. Thus, if a company filed an “unmistakably false affidavit” then the misconduct is per se material. According to Judge Rader, this exception will help to restore a needed balance in patent law between encouraging “honesty before the PTO” and reducing “unfounded accusations of inequitable conduct.”

Finally, the remedy for inequitable conduct was dramatically changed. Previously, the remedy for inequitable conduct had earned itself the title of being the “‘atomic bomb’ of patent law” because of its far-reaching and potentially devastating financial, reputational and intellectual effects. A successful inequitable conduct defense could “render[] the entire patent unenforceable,” was unable to be “cured by reissue or reexamination” and could “spread from a single patent to render unenforceable other related patents and applications in the same technology.” Thus, once the trigger was pulled on an inequitable conduct defense, a company’s entire patent portfolio could face the firing squad. However, this majority holding recognized the concept of basic fairness undergirding the doctrine of inequitable conduct and held that courts should limit their application of the complete unenforceability remedy to “instances where the patentee’s misconduct resulted in the unfair benefit of receiving an unwarranted claim.”

The Therasense ruling will require patent attorneys to curb their inclination to over-use the defense of inequitable conduct and may alleviate the prior art research pressures of filing for a patent. Attorneys will also need to revise their trial strategies since those who do not update their playbook with the Federal Circuit’s new rules will likely fail on their inequitable conduct allegations. With stricter standards for proving intent and materiality and new limits on the application of inequitable conduct as a remedy, courts can predict more hesitation from alleged patent-infringers and the PTO can expect less prior art paperwork flooding their office.

Federal Circuit Attempts to Eradicate the Plague of Inequitable Conduct, Sets New Standards

The Federal Circuit issued its much anticipated en banc decision in Therasense, Inc. v. Becton, Dickinson & Co. on May 25, 2011 regarding inequitable conduct by patent applicants and attorneys during prosecution of patents. The Federal Circuit established a new standard for materiality and clarified its contradictory precedent on intent to deceive—the two factual predicates that must be established to prove inequitable conduct.  The Court thus recognized the problems created by the overuse of inequitable conduct claims by litigants and the differing standards applied by federal courts in evaluating issues of materiality and intent to deceive.

Inequitable conduct is an affirmative defense to a claim of patent infringement. At its most fundamental level, the battle cry of inequitable conduct is an assertion that the patent applicant or lawyer acted fraudulently before the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Therefore, notwithstanding any finding of infringement, the patent should be rendered unenforceable.

Because of the frequency with which it is plead, the potential devastating effects it has on the rights of the patent owner, the potential harm it may cause to the reputation of patent lawyers associated with the prosecution of the patent and the harm it has caused the examination process before the Patent and Trademark Office, the Federal Circuit has described inequitable conduct as both an “atomic bomb” and a “plague” on the patent system.

Court Creates “But-For” Test for Materiality

The Court laid out a new test for materiality that significantly raises the bar. With one exception, the Federal Circuit explained that information is material only when a claim would not have been allowed by the Patent and Trademark Office had the office been aware of the information. The one exception to this “but-for” test is in cases of affirmative egregious misconduct. For example, where the patent applicant “deliberately planned and carefully executed scheme[s]” to defraud the Patent and Trademark Office or courts, such information and misconduct is always material.

Court Adopts “Single Most Reasonable Inference” Test for Intent

Addressing the “intent” prong, the Federal Circuit clarified that a party must show, by clear and convincing evidence, that the patentee made a deliberate decision to withhold a known material reference. The Court was careful to note that the intent prong is independent of the materiality prong and that the sliding scale approach where a party could demonstrate a lower level of intent if the information was highly material is no longer acceptable. Instead, to meet the test, the evidence must be sufficient to require a finding of deceitful intent in light of all the circumstances. The specific intent to deceive must be the single most reasonable inference able to be drawn from the evidence. Finally, the Court noted that a patentee need not offer any good faith explanation to counter a finding of intent until the accused infringer first proves a threshold level of intent to deceive by such clear and convincing evidence.

Overall, the Federal Circuit adopted a more stringent standard for proving inequitable conduct that is likely to reduce the high number of meritless inequitable conduct claims in litigation. Notwithstanding the high hurdles introduced by way of this landmark opinion, patent applicants still need to take care in managing the disclosure of information during prosecution and be ever mindful of material information including disclosures and arguments made in related foreign applications.

Making Therasense of the Inequitable Conduct Doctrine

In a split in its decision (6-1-4), the Federal Circuit’s May 25, 2011 en banc opinion in Therasense, Inc. v. Becton, Dickinson and Co. attempts to unify the patch work of opinions on inequitable conduct, which is a judicially-created doctrine rooted in the U.S. Supreme Court’s cases on the doctrine of “unclean hands” where egregious conduct had occurred.1 (Full decision(opens in a new window)). The Federal Circuit emphasized that the previous assertions of the inequitable conduct doctrine based on its precedent have “plagued not only the courts but also the entire patent system.”2

The majority opinion of the Federal Circuit in Therasense tries to balance the importance of patent applicants being honest in dealings with the United States Patent Office (“Patent Office”) with the appropriate standard of review in determining whether inequitable conduct has actually occurred. As the Federal Circuit explained, the “low standards for intent and materiality” created by its previous opinions “have inadvertently led to many unintended consequences” including “increased adjudication cost and complexity, reduced likelihood of settlement, burdened courts, strained PTO resources, increased PTO backlog, and impaired patent quality[.]” Therefore, the Federal Circuit finally intervened to tighten the standard and redirect the application of the inequitable conduct doctrine to benefit the public and the patent system by protecting against “egregious misconduct, including perjury, the manufacture of false evidence, and the suppression of evidence.”3

The Decision

In Therasense, the Federal Circuit redefined the requirements for both the materiality and intent prongs, both of which are required to be proved by clear and convincing evidence, in making a determination of an inequitable conduct. The following charts illustrates the fractured nature of previous Federal Circuit opinions and how the en banc opinion unified the previous patch work of opinions:

Materiality

Before

At least 5 different standards, including:

  • refutes or is inconsistent with a position the applicant takes in … asserting an argument of patentability;
  • a “reasonable examiner” would have considered the information or prior art “important” in deciding whether to allow the application;
  • the misrepresentation was so material that the patent should not have issued;
  • the misrepresentation actually caused the examiner to approve the patent application when he would not otherwise have done so; and
  • the misrepresentation may have influenced the patent examiner in the course of prosecution.
After

But-For Test

  • the deception is only material if the USPTO would not have allowed the claim if it had been aware of the undisclosed information.

 

Intent

Before

General intent to deceive based on totality of circumstances.

After

Specific intent to deceive with evidence of knowing and deliberate decision to deceive.

Although actual evidence is not required, the Federal Circuit found that “to meet the clear and convincing evidence standard, the specific intent to deceive must be ‘the single most reasonable inference able to be drawn from the evidence.'”4 The Federal Circuit further explained “[i]n making this patentability determination, the court should apply the preponderance of the evidence standard and give claims their broadest reasonable construction.”5

Finally, the Federal Circuit clarified that “a [district] court must weigh the evidence of intent to deceive independent of its analysis of materiality.”6 Consequently, the Federal Circuit has abolished the sliding scale of intent and materiality.

Sliding Scale

Before

A strong showing of intent may be allow a weak showing of materiality, and vice versa.

After

No sliding scale.

Response by Patent Office

In its ruling, the Federal Circuit expressly rejected the definition of materiality in 37 C.F.R §1.56 (“Rule 56”). The Court stated that it was not bound by Rule 56, and that Rule 56 “sets such a low bar for materiality, adopting this standard would inevitably result in patent prosecutors continuing the existing practice of disclosing too much prior art of marginal relevance and patent litigators continuing to charge inequitable conduct in nearly every case as a litigation strategy.”7

In reply to the Federal Circuit ruling, the Patent Office quickly issued a press release indicating that it is carefully studying the opinion and “expect to soon issue guidance to applicants regarding the materials they must submit to the Patent Office under their duty of disclosure.”8 It is unclear what actions the Patent Office may take, but if it amends Rule 56 to correspond with the en banc decision in Therasense, it could further strengthen the certainty of the standards required for equitable practice before the Patent Office.

What Does the Future Hold?

Going forward, the Therasense opinion may allow patent practitioners to reassess what documents they list in information disclosure statements and other filings with the Patent Office.  Moreover, future Patent Office guidance should clarify the issue of what needs to be disclosed to the examiner. Additionally, it is anticipated that the Therasense opinion will reduce the number inequitable conduct allegations, but it may also require more flexibility from various patent rules of district courts, which routinely require allegations of inequitable conduct to be made before the close of discovery.

Notably, it did not take long for a U.S. district court to rely on this new ruling in deciding to deny a motion for a finding of unenforceability due to inequitable conduct. In Ameranth, Inc. v Menusoft Systems Corp., et al.,9 the district court applied the new Therasense standard the day after it was issued, finding that although the “but-for” standard was met, the defendants failed to prove, by clear and convincing evidence, that there was specific intent to deceive the Patent Office.10

The Federal Circuit decision, however, did leave some potential new battlegrounds regarding the application of inequitable conduct. First, the Federal Circuit recognized the ability of district courts to infer intent from indirect evidence. Although the Court attempted to limit this loophole by stating “when there are multiple reasonable inferences that may be drawn, intent to deceive cannot be found,”11 it remains to be seen how district courts will apply this standard. Additionally, the Federal Circuit provided that when a “patentee has engaged in affirmative acts of egregious conduct” the misconduct is deemed to be material. This level of intent may overcome the requirement of “but-for” materiality having to be proved. The Federal Circuit suggests that this analysis should incorporate elements of the unclean hands doctrine, but it does not provide clear guidance on how this should be interpreted and suggests that this egregious conduct exception will allow for “flexibility to capture extraordinary circumstances.”12

Although this is a way to curtail the allegations of inequitable conduct, it is not the end of the story, and it remains to be seen if the U.S. Supreme Court will weigh in on the application of inequitable conduct or attempt to harmonize the Federal Circuit’s “but-for” test with the standards applied by other administrative agencies like the Securities Exchange Commission. We will continue to monitor the case and provide updates as it proceeds.

Federal Circuit Significantly Restricts the Doctrine of Inequitable Conduct in Therasense v. Becton Dickenson

On May 25, 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued an en banc decision in Therasense v. Becton Dickenson, No. 2008-1511 (Fed. Cir., May 25, 2011), outlining a heightened standard for inequitable conduct in patent infringement cases, requiring a finding of both specific intent to deceive and a “but-for” materiality.

The doctrine of inequitable conduct is a defense to patent infringement that, if proved, bars enforcement of the patent. In making its decision, the Federal Circuit noted that the doctrine evolved from three early U.S. Supreme Court Cases, which involved particularly egregious misconduct, including perjury, the manufacture of false evidence, and the suppression of evidence, to a broader scope of misconduct including the mere nondisclosure of information to the PTO. In addition, the doctrine evolved from a mere dismissal of the suit, to the unenforceability of the entire patent and its continuations and divisionals. In order to prove inequitable conduct, the accused infringer must prove intent and materiality by clear and convincing evidence. If the infringer meets this burden, the court must then weigh the equities to determine whether the applicant’s conduct before the PTO warrants rendering the entire patent unenforceable. The Federal Circuit noted that the standards for materiality have fluctuated over time, and the standard has been weakened by placing intent and materiality on a sliding scale, thus both conflating and diluting the standards at the same time. As a result, inequitable conduct has become a significant litigation strategy, increasing the complexity, duration, and cost of patent litigation. According to the Federal Circuit, one study estimated that eighty percent of patent infringement cases included allegations of inequitable conduct. This has plagued the courts and the whole patent system.

In this en banc decision, the Federal Circuit adopted a much more restrictive test for inequitable conduct. With regard to intent, an accused infringer must now prove that the patentee acted with specific intent to deceive the PTO. For example, the accused infringer must prove by clear and convincing evidence that:

(1) the applicant knew of the reference,

(2) knew that it was material to the prosecution of the application, and

(3) made a deliberate decision to withhold it.

With regard to materiality, the Federal Circuit adopted a “but-for” standard, e.g. but-for the non-disclosure of the reference, the patent would not have issued.This is a much more restrictive standard than the prior standard and even the patent office’s own standard under Rule 56. In fact, the Federal Circuit said specifically that they do not adopt the PTO’s definition of materiality under Rule 56.

The Therasense decision has strictly limited the usefulness of the inequitable conduct doctrine as a defense to patent infringement. It is likely that this decision will help to simplify patent infringement cases and may lead to more patents being upheld and infringed.

Therasense Inc. v. Becton, Dickinson and Company—The Federal Circuit tightens the standards necessary to establish the inequitable conduct defense by requiring a “but-for” showing of materiality

In Therasense Inc. v. Becton, Dickinson and Co., Appeal No. 2008-1511(May 25, 2011), an en banc Federal Circuit issued a significant ruling on the elements necessary to establish an inequitable conduct defense. The stakes for a patent owner facing a charge of inequitable conduct are high: inequitable conduct renders the affected patent unenforceable and could support a finding that the case was exceptional, entitling the alleged infringer to attorneys fees. A party alleging inequitable conduct had to show that the patentee misrepresented or failed to disclose material information with an intent to deceive the Patent Office. The courts were then to engage in an equitable “balancing” of materiality and intent to determine whether the conduct justified finding the patents unenforceable.

While recent scholarship suggests that the defense was not particularly successful in cases that made their way to the Federal Circuit and that the Federal Circuit applied stricter standards as to the elements of the defense, the incentives to assert the defense were so great that patent litigators were alleging inequitable conduct as a matter of course. In fact, the defense of inequitable conduct was said to have been asserted in as many as 60 to 80 percent of patent infringement cases. Also, many believed that the standards for finding inequitable conduct elements had not been sufficiently articulated by the Federal Circuit.

In Therasense, a six-judge majority addressed those concerns by significantly tightening the standards to be used in assessing the materiality and intent elements. Most importantly, the majority held that in most circumstances the party asserting an inequitable conduct defense must establish that “but-for” the misrepresentation or omission, the patent would not have issued. Further, materiality and intent were held to be separate requirements and were no longer part of a sliding scale where a showing of greater materiality permitted a showing of lesser intent. The Federal Circuit did, however, recognize that in instances of egregious misconduct, a “but-for” showing would not be required.

The decision brings to a close an almost 30-year effort by the Federal Circuit to tighten up the standards for proving inequitable conduct which the Court had earlier described as “a plague” on the patent system. As a result, it was contributing to the massive citation of prior art to the PTO, which in turn contributed significantly to the backlog of patent applications. The use of the inequitable conduct defense was also said to haveFederal Circuit tightens the standards necessary to establish the inequitable conduct defense by requiring a “but-for” showing of materiality  several other negative effects, such as the potential to destroy parts of patent portfolios/families, inhibit the possibility of settlement and cast a cloud over the reputations of inventors and patent prosecutors. Indeed, the Federal Circuit prefaced its holding by stating that it “now tightens the standards for finding both intent and materiality in order to redirect [the inequitable conduct] doctrine that has been overused to the detriment of the public.” Slip Op. at 24.

The Federal Circuit created an exception to the “but-for” materiality holding in the case of “affirmative egregious misconduct.” Id. at 29. One example of such egregious misconduct would be the filing of an unmistakably false affidavit. The Federal Circuit pointed out that the egregious misconduct exception provided a measure of flexibility to capture extraordinary circumstances.

In the Therasense case, the alleged misconduct had been the failure to disclose briefs that the patent applicant had submitted to the European Patent Office regarding the European counterpart of a related patent owned by the patent applicant. The District Court had found the patent unenforceable due to this failure to disclose. The Federal Circuit reversed and remanded and instructed the District Court to determine whether the PTO would not have granted the patent but for the failure to disclose the European Patent Office briefs. The Court also vacated the District Court finding of intent to deceive because it had decided this issue under the wrong standard. The District Court was instructed to determine whether there was clear and convincing evidence demonstrating that the patent applicant knew of the European Patent Office briefs, knew of their materiality and made the conscious decision not to disclose them in order to deceive the PTO.

The four judge dissent stressed that the “but-for” test of materiality departed from Federal Circuit precedent and was inconsistent with the PTO’s standard set forth in PTO Rule 56. The majority opinion’s response to the dissent was that the PTO’s Rule 56 standard was one of the major causes of the rampant use of the inequitable conduct defense.

The Patent and Trademark Office was quick to react to the decision. On May 26, 2011 it announced that it was “carefully studying the important en banc decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in the case of Therasense v. Becton, Dickinson to assess how it may impact agency practices and procedures.The agency also announced that it expects to soon issue guidance to applicants related to the prior art and information they must disclose to the Office in view of Therasense.” As the press release noted, the Therasense “decision resolves uncertainties in many aspects of how district courts must apply the inequitable conduct doctrine.”

Insurer’s Alleged Failure to “Meaningfully Communicate” with its Insured Supports a Bad Faith Claim: “Is There a Duty to Translate when a Language Barrier Exists?”

Background

As the United States becomes more of a “melting pot,” the extent of an insurer’s duty to meaningfully communicate with non-English speaking insureds is seemingly and increasingly going to be called in to question.  Thus, important information is often needed from an insured in order for an insurer to reach a coverage decision on their claim.  Therefore, the question becomes: what is “reasonable and meaningful communication” when a language barrier exists, i.e., to what lengths must an insurer go to properly communicate with its insured?

On the other hand, when an insured who neither speaks nor reads English executes an insurance form, e.g., an application for insurance, a non-waiver agreement or a proof of loss; to what extent can an insurer rely on the insured’s attestation under such circumstances?  Two recent decisions provide insight on how courts might view an insurer’s rights and obligations when these types of issues arise.

Young Sook Pak and In Suk Pak t/d/b/a Pak’s Fook Market and Big Mount Laundromat and Joe’s Grocery Store, v. Alea London Ltd. and Sirius International Ins. Corp., 2009 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 65640 (M.D. Pa. July 30, 2009)

Young Sook Pak and In Suk Pak are husband and wife, and operate various businesses including Joe’s Grocery Store in York, Pennsylvania.  On April 8, 2006, the north wall of Joe’s Grocery Store partially collapsed.  Prior to its collapse, the wall was covered in vines and other vegetation.  The coverage dispute in this case was whether deterioration or decay was visible on the wall prior to its collapse.  The Paks state that no deterioration was evident to them prior to the date of loss, and state that they took preventative steps to maintain the entire building.

After the wall collapsed, the Paks filed a claim with All Risks, who assigned the case to an adjuster, Robert Faith of Johns Eastern Company, to conduct an investigation.  Faith contacted the Paks but determined that it was difficult to communicate with them because they didn’t speak English very well.  Allegedly, thereafter, no one on behalf of All Risk ever attempted to get a Korean interpreter to speak to the Paks about the incident, and all remaining conversations between the defendants’ representatives and the Paks were in English.

Faith couldn’t remember what he talked about with the Paks during his initial visit to the site, and he couldn’t recall whether he asked them any questions about the maintenance that they performed on the wall or the property in general.  However, because he couldn’t determine the cause of the collapse, he hired Kelly Huff, a professional engineer with SEA Limited.  Huff visited the loss site and issued an opinion that the wall collapsed because of a lack of maintenance and continuous water seepage, which caused the deterioration of the wood framing and the brick and mortar joints.  The parties disagree whether Huff spoke to the Paks about the condition of the wall prior to its collapse.

Based on Huff’s report, Faith recommended to All Risks that the claim be denied; and on May 22, 2006, Faith sent a letter to the Paks officially denying the claim.  The Paks asserted that the loss should be covered because the decay leading to the collapse was hidden from view, and it was not known to them at the time of the collapse.  Accordingly, they filed suit alleging breach of contract and bad faith.

The defendants filed a motion for summary judgment contending that even if the plaintiffs survive summary judgment on their breach of contract claim, they have presented insufficient evidence to sustain their bad faith claim.  Specifically, defendants argue that plaintiffs can’t show by clear and convincing evidence that the defendants lacked a reasonable basis for their denying the claim.

However, the plaintiffs argued that there were several genuine issues of material fact for trial. Specifically, they argued that (1) defendants conducted an investigation without consideration of the coverage of the insurance policy; (2) they failed to conduct a meaningful investigation regarding whether decay was visible to plaintiffs; (3) they made no effort to meaningfully communicate with plaintiffs; and (4) defendants blindly relied on a single expert witness.

The court in this case, while not reaching a conclusion that the insurer acted in bad faith, did conclude that there was sufficient evidence for a jury to decide the question of whether the insurer failed to conduct a meaningful investigation, i.e., meaningfully communicate with the insureds regarding whether the decay of the collapsed wall was visible to the Paks prior to the collapse.  Accordingly, the court denied the defendants’ motion for summary judgment.

Lopez v. Farmers Texas County Mut. Ins. Co., 2007 WL 703496 (Tex. App., Texarkana 2007)

In this case, the Texarkana Court of Appeals addressed the issue of Mr. Lopez, a Farmers’ insured who neither spoke nor read English, but who signed four separate uninsured motorist coverage waivers, all of which were clearly stated in English.  After an accident, the insured applied for UM/UIM coverage and was denied.  Lopez sued Farmers for breach of contract and extra-contractual damages, arguing that the waiver that he signed was ineffective because he did not understand the waivers.  The insured relied upon Uniguard Sec. Ins. Co. v. Schafer, 572 S.W.2d 303 (Tex. 1978), for the proposition that an insured must have some knowledge of what he is waiving or rejecting.  Farmers moved for and was granted summary judgment based on the four waivers that were executed and Mr. Lopez appealed.

On appeal, Mr. Lopez conceded that the waivers were clear, but complained that he did not speak or understand the English language, and that the insurer and/or its representatives had allegedly failed to explain the waivers to him.  Lopez further argued that, in accordance with the court’s ruling in Uniguard v. Schafer, it was the insurer’s burden to demonstrate that an insured knew he or she was rejecting UM coverage.

However, the appellate court disagreed and held that it would not place a duty on insurers to translate or explain waivers.  Further, the court rejected the proposition that Schaefer imposed a burden on the insurer to show that the insured actually understood the waiver.  Instead, the court interpreted Schaefer to mean that “[a] waiver [need only] be sufficiently explicit so [that] it objectively communicates its effect as waiving or rejecting the coverage in question.”

Accordingly, the court refused to recognize a duty to translate the form document into a language the insured would understand, or to show that an otherwise explicit form was more fully explained to the insured before it was executed.  Instead, the Texarkana court held that the waiver must only be sufficiently explicit to objectively communicate its effect as a waiver or rejection of the coverage in question.  Accordingly, the Texarkana Court of Appeals affirmed the trial court’s decision and concluded that the insured’s multiple signing of waivers was sufficient to create a showing that the insured had waived his UM/UIM coverage.

Conclusion

There are very few cases that have clearly and definitively addressed an insurer’s rights and obligations concerning their communication with non-English speaking insureds.  The cases discussed above, while not widely authoritative, offer some degree of insight into how courts may view these issues as more and more suits of this type are filed.